Olympic Bunker Trap

Olympic Bunker Trap 2017-11-08T12:25:09+00:00

Olympic trap is one of the ISSF shooting events, introduced to the Olympic program in 1900; the current version was introduced in 1950. In International competitions the course of fire is 125 shots for men and 75 shots for women. There is a 25-shot final for the top six competitors. Olympic trap is also referred to as International and/or Bunker trap.

PLAYING THE GAME

Olympic Trap uses 15 fixed-angle machines as opposed to the single oscillating machine used in American Trap or DTL. The 15 machine computer controlled program is designed to deliver 10 left, 10 right and 5 straight-away targets to each competitor in a randomized sequence. A microphone release system is employed to provide uniformity in target release times.

SHOOTING A ROUND

The process of a round is as follows: There are six shooters, one to each station, with the sixth shooter initially starting at a holding station immediately behind shooter number one. At the beginning of first round of the day, test firing is allowed at the referee’s permission. Upon receiving the start signal, the first shooter has 10 seconds to call for his target. After firing at his target (each shooter gets 2 shots per target), the first shooter waits for the second shooter to complete firing, then moves to station two, with the shooter on station six smoothly moving to station one. This procedure continues through the squad until the completion of the round.

Generally, the round is refereed by a person on the line, behind the shooters. They use a bicycle-type horn or similar, to signal lost targets. He is assisted by one or two flankers to either side of the bunker who keep score.